English Translation Style Guide for EU – Writing English – FOREIGN IMPORTS
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FOREIGN WORDS AND PHRASES IN ENGLISH TEXT Foreign words and phrases used in an English text should be italicised (no inverted commas) and should have the appropriate accents, e.g. inter alia, raison d’être. Exceptions: words and phrases now in common … Read More

English Translation Style Guide for EU – Writing English – ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS
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ABBREVIATIONS General. The prime consideration when using abbreviations should be to help the reader. First, then, they should be easily understood. So when an abbreviation that may not be familiar to readers first occurs, it is best to write out … Read More

English Translation Style Guide for EU – Writing English – NUMBERS
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General. In deciding whether to write numbers in words or figures, the first consideration should be consistency within a passage. As a general rule write low numbers (up to nine inclusive) in words and larger numbers (10 and above) in … Read More

English Translation Style Guide for EU – Writing English – APOSTROPHE
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Possessive of nouns. The possessive form of nouns is marked by an apostrophe followed by an -s. After the plural ending ‘s’, however, the possessive -s is omitted: the owner’s car women’s rights footballers’ earnings one month’s / four months’ … Read More

English Translation Style Guide for EU – Writing English – PUNCTUATION – DASHES, BRACKETS, MARKS
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DASHES Dashes vs hyphens. Most users of word processors do not distinguish between dashes and hyphens, using hyphens to represent both short dashes (‘en’ dashes = –) and long dashes (‘em’ dashes = —) commonly used in typeset documents. However, … Read More

English Translation Style Guide for EU – Writing English – PUNCTUATION – COMMA
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Items in a series Here, the comma may be considered to stand for a missing ‘and’ or ‘or’. John mowed the lawn, Mary did the cooking and Frank lazed around. He came, saw and conquered. The committee considered sugar, beef … Read More

English Translation Style Guide for EU – Writing English – PUNCTUATION – FULL STOP, COLON, SEMICOLON
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The punctuation in an English text must follow the rules and conventions for English, which often differ from those applying to other languages. Note in particular that: punctuation marks in English are always — apart from dashes (see 3.17) and … Read More

English Translation Style Guide for EU – Writing English – SPELLING – COMPOUND WORDS AND HYPHENS
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General. Compounds may be written as two or more separate words, with hyphen(s), or as a single word. There is a tendency for compounds to develop into single words when they come to be used more frequently: data base, data-base, … Read More

English Translation Style Guide for EU – Writing English – SPELLING – GEOGRAPHICAL NAMES
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2.34 General. Many place names have an anglicised form, but as people become more familiar with these names in the language of the country concerned, so foreign spellings will gain wider currency in written English. As a rule of thumb, … Read More

English Translation Style Guide for EU – Writing English – SPELLING – CAPITAL LETTERS
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2.16 General. In English, proper names are capitalised but ordinary nouns are not. The titles and names of persons, bodies, programmes, legal acts, documents, etc. are therefore normally capitalised: the President of the Council, the Director-General for Agriculture the Commission, … Read More

English Translation Style Guide for EU – Writing English – SPELLING – INTERFERENCE EFFECTS
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2.14 Confusion between English words. Look out for errors involving the pairs below. dependent (adj. or noun) dependant (noun only) license (verb) licence (noun) practise (verb) practice (noun) principal (adj. or noun) principle (noun) stationary (adj.) stationery (noun) 2.15 Confusion … Read More

English Translation Style Guide for EU – Writing English – SPELLING – CONVENTIONS
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1 British spelling. Follow standard British usage, but remember that influences are crossing the Atlantic all the time (for example, the spellings program and disk have become normal British usage in information technology, while sulfur has replaced sulphur in scientific … Read More

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