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Reducing computer vulnerabilities

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Computer code is regarded by some as just a form of mathematics. It is theoretically possible to prove the correctness of computer programs (within very limited circumstances) though the likelihood of actually achieving this in large-scale practical systems is regarded as unlikely in the extreme by most with practical experience in the industry — see Bruce Schneier et al.

It’s also possible to protect messages in transit (ie, communications) by means of cryptography. One method of encryption —the one-time pad —has been proven to be unbreakable when correctly used. This method was used by the Soviet Union during the Cold War, though flaws in their implementation allowed some cryptanalysis (See Venona Project). The method uses a matching pair of key-codes, securely distributed, which are used once-and-only-once to encode and decode a single message. For transmitted computer encryption this method is difficult to use properly (securely), and highly inconvenient as well. Other methods of encryption, while breakable in theory, are often virtually impossible to directly break by any means publicly known today. Breaking them requires some non-cryptographic input, such as a stolen key, stolen plaintext (at either end of the transmission), or some other extra cryptanalytic information.

Social engineering and direct computer access (physical) attacks can only be prevented by non-computer means, which can be difficult to enforce, relative to the sensitivity of the information. Even in a highly disciplined environment, such as in military organizations, social engineering attacks can still be difficult to foresee and prevent.

In practice, only a small fraction of computer program code is mathematically proven, or even goes through extensive security audits, so it’s usually possible for a determined cracker to read, copy, alter or destroy data in well secured computers. You can reduce a cracker’s chances by keeping your systems up to date, using a security scanner or/and hiring competent people responsible for security. The effects of data loss/damage can be reduced by careful backing up and insurance.

Security measures

A state of computer “security” is the conceptual ideal, attained by the use of the three processes:

  1. Prevention,
  2. Detection, and
  3. Response.
  • User account access controls and cryptography can protect systems files and data, respectively.
  • Firewalls are by far the most common prevention systems from a network security perspective as they can (if properly configured) block the normal packet types, preventing some kinds of attacks.
  • Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS’s) are designed to detect network attacks in progress and assist in post-attack forensics, while audit trails and logs serve a similar function for individual systems.
  • “Response” is necessarily defined by the assessed security requirements of an individual system and may cover the range from simple upgrade of protections to notification of legal authorities, counter-attacks, and the like. In some special cases, a complete destruction of the system is favored.

Today, computer security comprises mainly “preventive” measures, like firewalls or an Exit Procedure. We could liken a firewall to the building of a good fence around your warehouse. Firewalls are common amongst machines that are permanently connected to the internet (though not universal, as demonstrated by the large numbers of machines “cracked” by worms like the Code Red worm which would have been protected by a properly-configured firewall). However, relatively few organisations maintain computer systems with effective detection systems, and fewer still have organised response mechanisms in place.

Licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses materials from the Wikipedia.

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