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Types of martingale to win in gambling

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Roulette

The great martingale

It is similar to the classic martingale, except that the player does not just double its every loss bet, it also adds a unit.

For example, the player bets one unit:

  • If he wins, he leaves the game with 2 units – 1 unit he played = 1 unit
  • If he loses once, he played 3 units; if he wins, he wins 6 units – 3 (he has just played in part 2) – 1 (he played in the 1st part) = 2 units
  • If he loses again, he played 7 units; if he wins, he wins 14 units – 7 (he has just played in Part 3) – 3 (he played in the second part) – 1 (he played in the 1st part) = 3 units
  • etc.

This martingale is as insecure as the classic martingale (the player feels that he can not lose anything, but that’s true only if he managed to bet just before leaving the game table!), however it increases earnings.

This technique has the same disadvantages as the classic martingale, but mostly it is even more limited by bets that the player can do: it is enough to lose three times, to have to play 15 times his bet next move (2047 times for the 11th bet).

Moreover, the gains may be considered low by money bet, and someone who would gain at tenth trial will bet 1023 units for a gain that amount to only 10 units.

Piquemouche

This is another variant of the classic martingale. The player starts with a unit when he wins, but when he loses, he increases his bet by one unit, it doubles only after three consecutive losses. It does not need to increase early bets in case of successive losses, it is safer, but the gains are lower (zero if you do not win in the first part) or need to win twice.

Example:

  • The player bets one unit; if he wins, he leaves the game with 2 units – 1 unit he played = 1 unit
  • If he loses once, he plays 1 unit; if he wins, he wins 2 units – 1 (he played in the 2nd part) – 1 (he played in the 1st part) = 0 unit
  • If he loses again, he plays 1 unit; if he wins, he wins 2 units – 1 (he played in part 3) – 1 (he played in the 2nd part) – 1 (he played in the 1st part) – 1 unit
  • So you need a second win to be a winner.
  • Following up if still losing 1 – 1 – 1 – 2 – 2 – 2 – 4 – 4 – 4-8 …
  • etc.

Whittaker

The player plays a whittaker when setting the sum of its two previous bets until he loses, and starts a unit when he wins.

Pyramid of dAlembert

The name is a reference to Jean le Rond d’Alembert, the eighteenth century mathematician. The idea is to increase the bet by one unit after a loss and decrease the bet by one unit after a win.

Used when thinking that gain decreases the chance to win again, while a loss increases the chance of winning (exemplified by the shadok principle “more it fails, the greater the chances that it works” ).

Reverse d’Alembert

This martingale incorporates the principle of the d’Alembert but bets are the other way: here we must decrease the bet by one unit when you lose and increase the bet by one unit when you win .

Conversely to the previous, it is used when we think that the past is likely representative of the future opportunity (eg, facing a row of slot machines).

Paroli

This martingale is to double the bet every gain (thus betting all we won), then, from a winning number set in advance, stop and start again with the initial bet. We talk about paroli of 1, if we stop after winning twice the bet, paroli 2 for four times if we won the bet, paroli 3 if we stop after winning eight times the bet, etc.

American martingale

Also known as “America Rising”, it asks to bet again the first sum + last loss. The player starts by increasing his bets by one unit until he wins. Once he loses, he keeps the bet he just lost, and bet the amount of the latest and first bet. When he wins, he keeps putting the bet, and scratch the first bet of his list. Then he bet the sum of the last and the first bet of his list, not taking into account that he scratched. example:

  • The player bets one unit:
  • If he wins he bets 2, if he loses he notes 1 and bets 2.
  • If he wins and he won he bets 3 (2 + 1), if he loses and he had won he notes 2 and bets 3 (first + last loss = 1 + 2). In this case the results are the same if he had lost in the first round.
  • etc.

Dutch martingale

The player implements this martingale when he loses. He retains all the bets that he has lost. He bets the lowest among from those he has lost (if he has lost several), adding 1. Then he bets the next bet, in ascending order. And with each victory the player wins the amount of a bet previously lost, plus 1.

This martingale is attractive in the sense that it seems as if the player gets as many victories as his failure remains positive gain, equal to 1/2 per bet. In reality, this is only true if the winning bets occur after the losing bets. Also after several successive failures, as long as the player has not been repaid by an equal amount of victories, he must constantly increase his bets to try to recover the lost money. But more the game continues, and more it is likely that this situation appears, which is why the Dutch martingale is a very strong tendency to runaway. In fact, it has a behavior close to the classic martingale with the advantage of not being limited by the maximum bet allowed.

Labouchere

The name of a British politician of the nineteenth century, Henry Labouchère, this martingale is based on the idea that a winning bet erases two losing bets. The player begins by noting the sequence 1 2 3 4 5 on line (or column). The principle is:

  • he always put the sum of two extreme numbers of the sequence (for example, at first glance, he put 6 = 1 + 5)
  • when he loses, he notes the amount he has to bet on the right of the suite
  • when he wins, he crosses out the two extreme numbers of the sequence which he just used to bet

This is a very attractive method. But his weakness, like d’Alembert and many others, is that it is a rising loss: the higher the player loses, the more it must bet big.

Reverse Labouchere

This is the reverse of the previous method: the player struck out bets when he loses. This is a rising gain: the player recycles gradually. It was made famous by the book Thirteen against the bank, by Norman Leigh (Albin Michel, 1976).

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